Archive for March, 2008

Choose your card for the week of 3/30/08

March 30, 2008

Choose your card for the week from Morgan-Greer Tarot by Bill Greer and Lloyd Morgan. When making your selection, don’t worry about what the cards mean. Base your choice on the pictures—the stories they tell and how they make you feel. Let us know which card you chose. Post a comment!

This deck is very much influenced by Rider-Waite but also offers some unique, subtly different interpretations.

Morgan-Greer Tarot, Nine of Swords Morgan-Greer Tarot, Four of Cups Morgan-Greer Tarot, Ten of Pentacles

Morgan-Greer Tarot, Ten of Wands Morgan-Greer Tarot, The Empress Morgan-Greer Tarot, Wheel of Fortune

Images from the Morgan-Greer Tarot reproduced with permission from U.S. Games, Inc.

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Choose your card for the week of 3/23/08

March 23, 2008

Choose your card for the week from Wheel of Change Tarot by Alexandra Genetti. When making your selection, don’t worry about what the cards mean. Base your choice on the pictures—the stories they tell and how they make you feel. Let us know what card you chose. Post a comment!

Wheel of Change, Prince of Cups Wheel of Change, Nine of Cups Wheel of Change, Eight of Swords

Prince of Cups, 9 of Cups, 8 of Swords

Wheel of Change, Ten of Wands Wheel of Change, Nine of Wands Wheel of Change, Knight of Cups

10 of Wands, 9 of Wands, Knight of Cups

Anastasia Haysler of Tarot-To-Go introduced me to this deck, and I just love it. When my husband looked through it, he said, “The artist who made this must be a very interesting person.” I have to agree. What an imagination!

This is an all-encompassing deck that includes diverse cultures and reflects the depth and breadth of the earth. It reminds those of us who are living an urban/suburban life that the world extends beyond our immediate community. There are also glimpses into the cosmos.

What I love most about the deck is the way it reflects the expanse of time. Many of the cards illustrate the layers of earth and sea and buried treasures. For example, the contents of the Prince of Cup’s vessel below look like they might slip into the sea and settle on the ocean floor, as shown in the Nine of Cups. How long will they rest there before snagged by a fishing line? The Nine of Wands could be an excavation site where the past is unearthed. These images become more powerful when juxtaposed with images from modern life: a baseball breaking a window, and a homeless man playing saxaphone.

This deck offers great insight and many surprises with each draw. It also comes with a 383 page book.

Images from The Wheel of Change Tarot reproduced with permission from Alexandra Genetti.

New Vision

March 19, 2008

Tarot of the Crone, 5 of Wands Five of Wands

I was away from the computer yesterday and am delighted to see the discussion that went on regarding the post: Choose your card for the week of 3/16/08. The Tarot of the Crone, by Ellen Lorenzi-Prince is such an inspiring deck.

Cathy’s question about card meanings varying from deck to deck, and Ellen’s response, which I read late last night, clearly influenced a dream I had this morning. In it, my brother was doing a reading for himself with a Rider-Waite deck, which has been a favorite of mine, and the one I typically read with. The dream took place in the back seat of a car—we were on a road trip, and I was there trying to keep the cards in the spread from sliding all over the place. He picked up the Knight of Wands and said, “What does it mean?” I asked him to tell me what he saw, and he enthusiastically delivered an interpretation that had nothing to do with the traditional meaning of the card. (I wish I could remember what he said!) My response was, “Well, there you go. You don’t need me to tell you what the card means.” The dream morphed and some of the cards were lost and then the whole deck. We reached our destination, and I anxiously searched under the seats and through bags and suitcases. Other decks kept turning up in different sizes and themes, but all I could focus on was finding my missing Rider-Waite. I woke up and looked at my tarot altar. For the first time yesterday morning, I had placed non-Rider-Waite cards there. The reading I did with the Tarot of the Crone moved me so much that I wanted to preserve it and simply put the Rider-Waite deck aside. I’ve got tons of decks that I love to play with, but I’ve been holding on a little too tightly to that classic RW.

Like many readers, when I give a reading, I always first encourage the seeker to tell me what he or she sees, and I really do believe that there isn’t one “right” interpretation. And yet, if I’m honest with myself, I must recognize that I’ve been unconsciously and irrationally thinking about the RW deck as the definitive deck.

The discussion yesterday, along with my dream, has made me think about the connection between reader and deck creator. The deck creator is a special kind of reader who visually manifests their interpretation of the tarot. He or she may embrace or redefine the ideas behind more traditional decks—and certainly there is no one “right” way to go about it. I suppose this is obvious, but I’m really feeling it in my heart and am excited by all the different visions in my collection.

Anyway, I love Tarot of the Crone because it is so original—and haunting as Jan said—and worth a second look as Carly said. I think the uniqueness of the philosophy behind this deck is what has stirred us all.

Image from Tarot of the Crone is reproduced with permission from Ellen Lorenzi-Prince. Image from Rider-Waite Tarot is reproduced with permission from U.S. Games, Inc.

Choose your card for the week of 3/16/08

March 15, 2008

Choose your card for the week from Tarot of the Crone by Ellen Lorenzi-Prince. When making your selection, don’t worry about what the cards mean. Base your choice on the pictures—the stories they tell and how they make you feel. (Clicking on the cards will take you to larger images on the Tarot of the Crone site.)

I love this deck—it speaks to my soul, and the artwork is gorgeous. It was very hard to select only six cards to share with you, but hopefully you will get a taste of how original Ellen’s interpretations are. (I definitely prefer the Tradition card below to the Hierophant!)

This deck replaces the court cards with the Faces of the Crone: Beast (Page), Witch (Knight) Grandmother (Queen), and Shadow.

The second edition of Tarot of the Crone was recently released and can be purchased at The Tarot Connection Shop. It comes with a beautiful pouch  in the color of your choice. The Tarot Connection also has a PDF you can download for free. It includes text that Ellen has written for the deck—even better, you might want to purchase the companion book.

Tarot of the Crone, Moon Tarot of the Crone, Two of Wands Tarot of the Crone, Two of Swords

Tarot of the Crone, Four of Cups Tarot of the Crone, Four of Disks Tarot of the Crone, Tradition

Let us know which card you chose—post a comment!

Images from Tarot of the Crone are reproduced with permission from Ellen Lorenzi-Prince.

Choose a Sun card for this Daylight Saving

March 9, 2008

Let us know which card you choose—post a comment!

The Sun brings matters into the open, and makes them visible. It symbolizes clarity and enlightenment, exuberance, warmth, and vitality.  I’ll gladly take an extra hour of sun over an hour of sleep! How about you?

Universal Waite, The Sun The Bohemian Gothic, The Sun Tarot of the Southwest Sacred Tribes, The Sun

Thoth Tarot, The Sun Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg Feng Shui Tarot, The Sun

The Sun cards are from the following decks: Row 1—Universal Waite, The Bohemian Gothic Tarot, Tarot of the Southwest Sacred Tribes, Row 2—Thoth Tarot, Russian Tarot of St. Petersburg, Feng Shui Tarot.

Choose your card for the week of 3/2/08

March 2, 2008

Choose your card for the week from The Fairytale Tarot by Karen Mahony, Alexandr Ukolov, and Irena Triskova of Magic Realist Press. When making your selection, don’t worry about what the cards mean. Base your choice on the pictures—the stories they tell and how they make you feel.

The book that comes with this beautiful deck includes each card’s fairytale. It’s a fabulous set!

The Fairytale Tarot, Ace of Cups The Fairytale Tarot, Ace of Wands The Fairytale Tarot, Four of Coins

The Ugly Duckling, Jack & the Beanstalk, The Fisherman & His Wife

The Fairytale Tarot, Five of Swords The Fairytale Tarot, Six of Wands The Fairytale Tarot, Ten of Wands

Little Red Riding Hood, The Emperor’s New Clothes, The Sorcerer’s Apprentice

Let us know which card you chose—post a comment!

Images from The Fairytale Tarot are reproduced with permission from Magic Realist Press.